WÄRTSILÄ
Encyclopedia of Marine and Energy Technology

F

327 results

Flaking

marine

Lifting the paint from the underlying surface in the form of flakes or scales.

Flame arrester, also flame arresting device

marine

A permeable matrix of metal, ceramic or other heat resistant material which can cool a deflagration flame, and any products of combustion, below the temperature required for the ignition of the flammable gas on the other side of the arrester.

Flame detector

marine

A device, which can detect the ultra-violet or infrared rays given off by a flame. It is used as fire detector near to fuel handling equipment and at boiler fronts.

Flame inhibitors

marine

Materials, which interfere chemically with the combustion process, and thereby extinguish the flames. Cooling and removal of fuel is necessary to prevent reignition.

Flame screen

marine

A portable or fixed device incorporating one or more corrosion resistant wire woven fabrics of very small mesh which is used for preventing sparks from entering a tank or vent opening or, for a short time, preventing the passage of flames.

Flame speed

marine

The speed at which a flame propagates along a pipe or other system.

Flame trap

marine

A gauze or perforated metal cover over an opening or vent to prevent the passage of flame.

Flameproof

marine

An enclosure for electrical equipment which must withstand an explosion of any gas or vapour that enters. No damage must occur and no flammable matter must escape.

Flammability

energy

Flammable materials are combustible materials that ignite easily at ambient temperatures.

Flammability limits

marine

The conditions defining the state of fuel-oxidant mixture at which application of an adequately strong external ignition source is only just capable of producing flammability in a given test apparatus (IBC Code).

Flammable fluid

marine

Any fluid, regardless of its flash point, capable of feeding a fire. Aviation fuel, diesel fuel, hydraulic oil (oil based), lubricating oil and hydrocarbon, are considered flammable fluids.

Flammable range

marine

A mixture of hydrocarbon gas and air cannot ignite unless its composition lies within a range of gas in air concentration known as the “flammable range”.

Flammable, also combustible

marine

Capable of being ignited and burnt.

Flange

marine

1. The part of a plate or shape bent at right angles to the main part. 2. A circular metal plate with holes formed or fitted on the ends of pipes in order to couple them together.

Flare

marine

1. An outward curvature of the side shell at the forward end (bow flare) above the waterline. 2. A night distress signal, (rocket parachute flare, hand flare). 3. A device which disposes unwanted oil or gas by burning.

Flash evaporation

energy

Flash evaporation (or partial evaporation) is the partial vapor that occurs when a saturated liquid stream undergoes a reduction in pressure by passing through a throttling valve or other throttling device.

Flash point

energy

The flash point of a volatile material is the lowest temperature at which its vapors ignite if given an ignition source.

Flash steam

energy

Steam produced when the pressure on a geothermal liquid is reduced.

Flash Steam Power Plant

energy

Flash steam plants take high-pressure hot water from deep inside the earth and convert it to steam to drive generator turbines. When the steam cools, it condenses to water and is injected back into the ground to be used again.

Flashpoint

marine

The lowest temperature at which a liquid gives off sufficient vapour to form a mixture with the air near its surface which, if ignited, will make a small flash, but will not catch fire. It is measured under standardized conditions.

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